Utah bans eminent domain for redevelopment agencies

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Good news from Utah -- the governor has signed into law a bill prohibiting redevelopment authorities from the exercise of eminent domain. In the name of increasing tax revenues or economic development, redevelopment authorities seize land from one private owner to sell it to another private entity. While there is hope that the U. S. Supreme Court will declare the practice unconstitutional when it rules in Kelo v. New London, it's nice to see that elected officials recognize the abuse of eminent domain and are taking steps to stop it. The Heartland Institute, an Chicago-based free market think tank, has published an analysis of the new law.

(Hat tip to Eminent Domain Watch.)

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Could a hotel be built on the land owned by Supreme Court Justice David H. Souter? A new ruling by the Supreme Court which was supported by Justice Souter himself itself might allow it. A private developer is seeking to use this very law to build a hot... Read More

Could a hotel be built on the land owned by Supreme Court Justice David H. Souter? A new ruling by the Supreme Court which was supported by Justice Souter himself itself might allow it. A private developer is seeking to use this very law to build a hot... Read More

1 Comments

theotherguy said:

Is anyone aware what Sand Springs is doing with their cut of Vision 2025? Its supposed to be for redeveloping an abandoned industrial area along 412 into retail. However, it seems the first area planned for dozing is a small area across from the new supercenter that contains 3 churches, several businesses, dozens of small homes and a school. Its not actually a "historic" neighborhood, but it is a neighborhood with character and long time residents. Sure, some of the houses deserve to be bulldozed and there is some kind of auto salvage yard that's pretty ugly, but to force people out of their homes to build the next Home Depot just doesn't seem right. Of course these homes are not worth much, so any buyout would force these people into either low income housing or a trailer out in the county.

I don't think that eminent domain ought to be used to make Sand Springs look like Broken Arrow. (nothing against B.A., wish we were getting Bass Pro)

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This page contains a single entry by Michael Bates published on June 5, 2005 12:41 PM.

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