Tulsa 1921 map

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A remarkable and detailed 1921 map of Tulsa is available for viewing online, from the Special Collections of the University of Tulsa McFarlin Library. The inset map shows the entire city, and is captioned;

TULSA
AND ADDITIONS
A Ready Reference and Guide Map to Tulsa's
OFFICE & PUBLIC BLDGS. CLUBS, R.R. PASSENGER &
FREIGHT DEPOTS, SCHOOLS, CHURCHES, PARKS &
CEMETERIES, PAVED & UNPAVED STREETS & NAMES,
STEAM, INTERURBAN & STREET RAILROADS,
FIRE PLUGS, CITY & FIRE LIMITS

Subdivisions are clearly labeled. Around the edges of the map are alphabetical listings of the categories mentioned above, plus banks, streets, hospitals, apartment buildings, and hotels. The street car and interurban lines are very easy to spot.

The outer part of the map depicts "Tulsa's industrial and commercial district : showing office and public bldgs. R.R. passenger & freight depots." It is more detailed, labeling individual buildings, and it covers a solid rectangle from Denver to Hartford, Easton to 5th St., plus extensions in to the west (to Frisco between Easton & 2nd), to the east (to 3rd & Madison and Admiral & Owasso), and to the south (to 12th and Main). Beyond these areas are residences and farmland.

Two publishers are listed on the map, the Dean-Brumfield Co. of Tulsa and the Standard Map Co. of Chicago.

Also in the collection is the Fowler & Kelly Aero View of Tulsa, 1918

The only disappointment about these two maps is that they appear to have been converted to JPEG format, which is great for photos of real life, but produces annoying blurs and other artifacts as a result of its lossy compression algorithm. PNG, a lossless compressed format, would have been a better choice.

UPDATE: Paul Uttinger provides a link to a better copy of the Aero View of Tulsa, 1918.

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4 Comments

Nancy said:

Great links and right on about using PNG instead of JPEG.

Paul said:

Wonderful map -- thanks for posting the link.

Dean-Brumfield Co. was in the Castle Building, which must be a survivor from 1921 or earlier, if it's the present-day 3-story building at 116 West Third St.

Michael: I did indeed Google Master Singers and Weather Report and got you 2007 blog on the group and their album. I do a weekly program called Weekend Radio, which is heard on 80 stations around the country, including KUOC in Edmond, and KBCW in McAlester (Saturdays at 10:00 PM). I have had the Master Singers 45 rpm since the late 60s and the Weather Forecast and the Highway Code have had frequent airings on WCLV over the decades. They are often requested items. After reading your blog I decided to play the entire album on the show of April 19th. I quote your blog as an introduction to the recording, and I would be pleased to send you a CD of the show. Simply send me your mailing address.

Your process of leaving a comment doesn't always work. The code to type in is not very clear.

Robert Conrad
President
WCLV
Cleveland Orchestra Broadcast Service
Host: Weekend Radio

Neil said:

From "American Lumberman" trade periodical the previous year (March 20, 1920; p.46) --

"Like all rapidly growing cities, Tulsa has run to 'additions.' It reminds you of diagrams in the textbooks of biology showing the multiplying of cells. Or of the sweep of a forest fire with flaming gases lighting underbrush far in advance of the main line of the fire. One addition would hardly be laid out until several more were begun beyond it. Low tracts that were at first passed by as unsalable were snapped up as the new growth closed around them, and ways were found to make them habitable."

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This page contains a single entry by Michael Bates published on March 29, 2014 12:01 AM.

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